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Passover Haggadah from the Gurs Camp

Gurs Haggadah
US Holocaust Memorial Museum

After the French Third Republic surrendered to Nazi Germany on June 22, 1940, the new Nazi-allied Vichy government began interning Jews deported from southwestern Germany and other recently conquered territories. The Vichy regime imprisoned 6,500 of these Jews in the Gurs detention camp in the Pyrenees mountains in southwestern France. Over the course of the war, more than 1,100 prisoners died in the camp from starvation, disease, and exposure; nearly 4,000 of them were eventually deported to death camps in occupied Poland.

In the spring of 1941, a small group of Jews in the camp, calling itself Comité Central d'Assistance (Central Aid Committee [CAC]), began working to produce a Haggadah1 to celebrate Passover. Prepared over the course of several weeks, and with limited resources, the publication of this Haggadah marked a major achievement for the group.

The document consists of five handwritten pages, front and back, composed largely from memory and copied using stencils. Since a set of Hebrew type was unavailable in the camp (and, in any case, many Jews in Gurs could not read Hebrew) CAC leader Rabbi Leo Ansbacher arranged the addition of two pages of songs and hymns printed in Latin letters.2 While only one page of the document had been duplicated by the time Passover arrived, complete copies were later produced using a manuscript smuggled out of the camp.3

The body of postwar testimony and commentary surrounding the Haggadah's publication,4 and its use in the 1941 celebration of Passover—a holy day marking an experience of great catastrophe in the Jewish tradition—shows that they took on special significance for survivors of Gurs.5 The Gurs Haggadah closely resembles traditional Haggadahs, and does not make reference to the circumstances of life in the camp, nor the dangers facing the camp’s prisoners. Yet, its form and content, distinguished by subtle changes, make it a unique document. What readings of the Haggadah might be possible during persecution and internment in the Gurs camp?6 What range of meanings could be applied to a Passover observed in captivity? 

The Haggadah comprises a narrative of the Jewish exodus from Egypt and is traditionally recited at the ceremonial Seder dinner.

A note, in French, on the final page names Ansbacher as the Haggadah’s editor. Both Rabbi Ansbacher and the document’s other main contributor, Aryeh Ludwig Zuckerman, were German-born Jews who had emigrated to Belgium. They were captured by German forces and deported to France in May of 1940. Both men survived the war.

See Tirza Oren, "Researching the Gurs Haggadah," in The Gurs Haggadah: Passover in Perdition, Bella Gutterman and Naomi Morgenstern, eds., trans. Nechama Kanner (Jerusalem: Devora Publishing and Yad Vashem, 2003), 47-53.

See Bella Gutterman and Naomi Morgenstern, "In the Gurs Camp" in The Gurs Haggadah: Passover in Perdition, Bella Gutterman and Naomi Morgenstern, eds., trans. Nechama Kanner (Jerusalem: Devora Publishing and Yad Vashem, 2003), 13-46.

The copy at hand, evidently given as a gift in later years, bears an inscription in German: "To my darling Inge Maas in memory of Camp de Gurs Passover 1941. Yours, Max Zeilberger."

For more on the relationship between Haggadah and the Holocaust, see Liora Gubkin, You Shall Tell Your Children: Holocaust Memory in American Passover Ritual (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2007).

Handwritten in German and undated.

Customary inscription used by religious Jews at the heading of written documents. 

Below appears an illustration of the Seder plate surrounded by the order of the Seder, which is traditionally marked by 15 Hebrew words (called "signs") indicating the actions performed at each stage of the Seder. This illustration appears in most Haggadahs. In this translation, these words are numbered to according to their ordered appearance, illustrating the design used in this modest Haggadah cover page.

Performed with wine, Kiddush is a ceremony conducted by a Jewish household at the first meal of the Sabbath (on a Friday night), or on a holy day, or at the lunch preceding it.

Unleavened bread traditionally eaten by Jews at Passover.

A piece of matzah put aside to be eaten at the end of the Seder meal. It is often hidden and then searched for by children present at the meal.

A segment of the Hebrew Bible recited at Passover consisting of Psalms 113-118.

Passover eve 1941 coincided with Shabbat. Customarily, additional blessings are recited in the instance that Passover (or any other major holiday) is celebrated on Shabbat. These additions are usually indicated with such notices as "in Shabbat add this," or appear in parentheses, as they do in this text.

In all known copies of the original Gurs Haggadah, this page is marked "2" but appears after the page numbered "6." This error stems from the fact that the original Haggadah was duplicated outside the camp without oversight by those who wrote it. For the sake of intellegibility, this translation reflects the page order of the original, sequentially paginated Gurs Haggadah.See Bella Gutterman and Naomi Morgenstern, eds., The Gurs Haggadah: Passover in Perdition (Jerusalem: Devora Publishing and Yad Vashem, 2003), 50-51. 

A Hebrew name for God. Literally, it means "my Lords."

In the text, the words "Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe" appear as an acronym, the equivalent of which would read in English “B.Y.A.G.S.U”. While this acronym regularly appears in Halachic writings, it is not the custom to use it in a Haggadah. Perhaps it was used to save space.

The closing parenthesis indicating the end of the Shabbat additional blessing is missing here. 

This part is written and recited in Aramaic.

This segment, traditionally recited by the youngest present person who is able to read it, was written in particularly clear and significantly larger letters.

Hebrew: a daily declaration of faith, recited in the morning and evening prayers and before retiring for the night. 

 

Maror (Hebrew) is the name of the bitter herb traditionally eaten in the Seder.

In the traditional Haggadah, this portion of the text reads "In the beginning, our ancestors were worshipers of idols."

The Land of Goshen is cited in the Bible as the place in Egypt given to Israelites by the Pharaoh in the time of Joseph, from which they later left Egypt at the time of the Exodus (Genesis 45:9-10).

 The acronym comes from the Hebrew names for the plagues.

For the meaning of the following Hebrew terms specifically related to stages of Passover Seder ritual, see the citations on page one of the document and translation.

While this stage of the Seder is referenced, it is not proceeded by an additional three pages of blessings usually found in the traditional Haggadah.

In traditional Haggadahs, this section typically features another four pages of blessings.

Hebrew: "Not for us." Likely refers to a Passover psalm with that name.

Hebrew: "To the end." Likely refers to the end of the Haggadah.

This psalm is typically recited by everyone present at the Seder. The bolded word "for" replaces the Hebrew word in the original text that signifies "for His kindness is eternal."

The body of water crossed by the Israelites during the Exodus.

The following two pages comprise a transliteration, using latin characters, of four Passover psalms. These psalms are sung or recited towards the end of the Seder. This transliteration reflects Hebrew as pronounced by Ashkenazi Jews, and is included for those present who cannot read Hebrew.

Ancient Jewish coins.

The sentence appears in French, and refers to the corresponding date on the Hebrew calendar in the month of Nissan.

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To my darling Inge Maas in memory of Camp de Gurs Passover 1941. Yours, Max Zeilberger.1

 

With God's help2

Haggadah for Passover3

1. Ka'desh (recite the Kiddush4)  2. Ur’chatz (wash the hands)

3. Kar'pas (eat a green vegetable)  4. Ya'chatz (break the middle matzah5 and hide a half of it for the Afikoman6)

 5. Magid (recite the Passover)  6. Rach'trah (wash the hands)

 7. & 8. Mo'tzi Ma'trah (say the blessing for bread and the special blessing for the matzah)

                            9. Maror (eat the bitter herb)  10. Kor'ech (eat the bitter herb and the matzah)

11. Shul'chan O'rech (serve the festive meal) 12. Tza'fun (eat the Afikoman)

13. Ba'rech (say the grace after the meal)

14. Hallel (recite the Hallel7)  15. Nir'tza (conclude the Seder)

(The sixth day.8 And the heavens and the earth and all their hosts were completed. And on the seventh day, God finished His labor that He had done. And He rested on the seventh day from all His labor that He had done. And God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it, for on it He rested from all His labor of creation that God had done.)9 Blessed are You, Adonai,10 our God, Sovereign of the universe, creator of the fruit of the vine.11 Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, who chose us from among all the nations, exalted us above people of every tongue, and sanctified us with His commandments. You have given us, Lord our God, with love (Sabbaths for rest and) holidays for rejoicing, festivals and seasons for celebration, this (Sabbath day and this) Festival of Matzos, season of our liberation (with love) a holy convocation in remembrance of the exodus from Egypt. For you have chosen us and sanctified us from among all the nations, and You have bequeathed to us (the Sabbath) and Your holy days with (love and favor,) joy and gladness. Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, who sanctifies (the Sabbath and) Israel and the seasons. (Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, creator of the light of fire. Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, who separates sacred from profane, light from darkness, Israel from the nations, and the seventh day from the six days of work. You have separated the sanctity of the Sabbath from the sanctity of festivals, and You have sanctified the seventh day from the six days of work. You have separated and sanctified Your people, Israel, with Your sanctity. Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, who separates one sanctum from another.12

Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, who has kept us alive, sustained us, and brought us to these times.

Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, creator of the fruit of the earth.

This is the bread of poverty that our ancestors ate in the land of Egypt. Let all who are hungry come and eat. Let all who are needy come and partake of the Passover offering. Now, we are here; next year, may we be in the land of Israel. Now, we are slaves; next year, may we be free.13

How different this night is from all other nights. On all14
other nights, we eat both leavened bread and matzah. On this night, 
we eat only matzah. On all other nights, we eat all kinds of herbs. 
On this night, we eat bitter herbs. On all other nights, we do not dip our food
even once. On this night, we dip twice.
On all other nights, we eat either sitting or 
reclining. On this night, we all recline. 

We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt, and Adonai, our God, brought us out from there with a strong hand and an outstretched arm. If the Holy One, Blessed Be He, had not brought our ancestors out of Egypt, then we, our children, and our children's children would still be enslaved to Pharaoh in Egypt. Therefore, even if we were all wise, all insightful, all old, and all knowledgeable in the Torah, we would still be commanded to discuss the exodus from Egypt. Moreover, one who elaborates on the exodus from Egypt is worthy of praise.

A tale is told of Rabbi Eliezer, Rabbi Joshua, Rabbi Elazar son of Azariah, Rabbi Akiva, and Rabbi Tarfon, who held a Seder in Bnai Brak. They discussed the exodus from Egypt all that night, until their students came and said to them, "Rabbis, the time has come to recite the morning Shema."15

Rabbi Elazar son of Azariah said: I am about seventy years old, but I did not understand why the exodus from Egypt is recalled at night until Ben Zoma explained: The Torah says, ". . . so that you remember the day of your exodus from Egypt all the days of your life." If it had said merely, "the days of your life," it would have meant only the days. However, because it says "all the days of your life," it includes the nights as well. The sages interpret the verse differently: "The days of your life" would have referred to this era only. "All the days of your life" includes the messianic era as well.

Blessed is the Omnipresent; Blessed is He. Blessed is the One Who gave the Torah to His people Israel; Blessed is He.

The Torah teaches of four children:

A wise one, a wicked one, a simple-minded one, and one who does not know enough to ask.

The wise one, what does he say? "What are the testimonies, laws, and statutes that the Lord, our God, commanded us?" You shall teach him the laws of Passover: One may not follow the Paschal offering with entertainment.

The wicked one, what does he say? "What is this service to you?" He refers to "you" rather than to himself.

Because he excludes himself from the group and rejects a fundamental principle, you must set his teeth on edge and say to him: "It is because of what Adonai did for me when I left Egypt." You refer to yourself ("to me") rather than to him, because if he had been there, he would not have been redeemed.

The simple-minded one, what does he say? "What is this?" You shall say to him: "With a strong hand, Adonai brought us out of Egypt, the house of bondage."

And as for the one who does not know enough to ask, you should open the discussion for him, as the Torah says: "It is because of what Adonai did for me when I left Egypt."

One may think that the discussion of the exodus must be from the first of the month. The Torah therefore says, 'On that day.' 'On that day,' however, could mean while it is yet daytime; the Torah therefore says, 'It is because of this.' The expression 'because of this' can only be said when matzah and maror16 are placed before you.

In the beginning, our ancestors were worshipers17 of the stars, but now the Omnipresent has drawn us to His service. As the scripture relates: "And Joshua said to all the people, 'Thus said Adonai, the God of Israel: Your ancestors dwelled beyond the river from time immemorial – Teraḥ, father of Abraham and father of Naḥor – and they worshiped other gods. And I took your father Abraham from beyond the river, and I led him throughout the whole land of Canaan. I multiplied his seed and gave him Isaac, and to Isaac I gave Jacob and Esau. To Esau I gave Mount Se'ir to possess it, and Jacob and his sons went down to Egypt."

Blessed be the One who keeps His promise to Israel, blessed be He.

For the Holy One, Blessed Be He, premeditated the end of Israel's enslavement, and fulfilled that which He foretold to our ancestor Abraham in the covenant between the pieces, as scripture relates: "And He said to Abraham: 'Know with certainty that your descendants will be strangers in a land not their own, and they shall serve its inhabitants, who will afflict them for four hundred years. But I will also judge the nation that they serve, and afterward they will leave with great wealth."

That which stood for our ancestors applies to us as well. For it was not only one individual who stood up against us to destroy us. Rather, in every generation they stand up against us to destroy us. But the Holy One, Blessed Be He, redeems us from their hands.

Go forth and learn what Laban the Aramean sought to do to Jacob, our ancestor. While Pharaoh only decreed death for the males, Laban sought to uproot everything, as scripture relates: "An Aramean Laban sought to destroy my father Jacob. Jacob went down to Egypt and sojourned there, few in number, and there he became a great, mighty, and populous nation." "He went down to Egypt:" He was compelled by the word of God. "And he sojourned there:" This teaches that he did not go down to settle in Egypt, but rather to sojourn there, as scripture relates: "They said to Pharaoh, 'We have come to sojourn in the land, for there is no pasture for the flocks of your servants, for the famine is severe in the land of Canaan. Now, therefore, let your servants dwell in the land of Goshen.'"18

"Few in number:" As scripture relates: “When your ancestors went down to Egypt there were seventy of them, and now Adonai, your God, has made you as numerous as the stars in the heavens." "And they became a nation there:” This teaches that the Israelites were distinct there. "Mighty:" As scripture relates: "And the Israelites were fruitful and swarmed and multiplied and became exceedingly mighty, and the land was filled with them."

"And populous:" as it is said: "I made you abundant as the growth of the field, and you have become plentiful and grew and became very beautiful: your breasts formed and your hair sprouted, yet you were naked and bare. And I passed over you and saw you wallowing in your bloods, and I said to you `By your blood you shall live,' and I said to you 'By your blood you shall live.'"

The Egyptians treated us harshly and afflicted us, and they set hard labor upon us. The Egyptians vilified us: As scripture relates: the Pharaoh said, "Come, let us deal wisely with them, lest they multiply and join our enemies when war comes, and fight against us, and leave the land."

And afflicted us: As scripture relates: "They placed taskmasters over them in order to afflict them with their burdens, and they built storage cities for Pharaoh, called Pithom and Ramses." And they set hard labor upon us: As scripture relates: "The Egyptians worked the Israelites severely."

We cried out to Adonai, God of our ancestors, and Adonai heard our voice and saw our suffering, our burden, and our oppression. We cried out to Adonai, God of our ancestors: As scripture relates: "Eventually, the king of Egypt died, and the Israelites sighed from their labor and cried out, and their plea for rescue from their labor reached God." And Adonai heard our voice: As scripture relates: "And God heard their groaning, and God remembered His covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob." And saw our affliction: This refers to the separation of men and women, as scripture relates: "God saw the Israelites, and God knew." Our burden: This refers to the sons, as scripture relates: The Pharoah said: "Cast every son who is born into the Nile, but let every daughter live." And our oppression: This refers to the persecution, as scripture relates: God said: “I also saw the oppression with which the Egyptians oppressed them." And Adonai brought us out of Egypt with a strong hand and an outstretched arm and with great manifestation, and with signs and wonders. And Adonai brought us out of Egypt Not by an angel, not by a seraph, and not by a messenger, but the Holy One, Blessed Be He, Himself, in His Glory, as it is said: God said, "I will pass through the land of Egypt tonight, and I will smite every firstborn in the land of Egypt, from man to beast. And I will execute judgment against all the gods of Egypt. I am Adonai." "I will pass through the land of Egypt, I, and not an angel. And I will smite every firstborn: I, and not a seraph. And I will execute judgment against all the gods of Egypt, I, and not the messenger. I am Adonai, I am He, and no other.

With a strong hand: This refers to the disease of livestock, as it is said: Moses said to Pharaoh: "Then the hand of Adonai will strike your livestock in the field - the horses, the donkeys, the camels, the cattle, and the sheep - with a very severe disease.” And with an outstretched arm: This refers to the sword, as it is said: "and his sword was unsheathed in his hand, stretched forth against Jerusalem." With great Manifestation: This refers to the revelation of the divine presence (Shechinah), as it is said: "Has any god endeavored to take a nation for himself from within the midst of another nation, with trials, with signs and wonders, with war, with a strong hand and an outstretched arm, and with displays of great manifestation, like all that Adonai, your God, did for you in Egypt before your eyes?" And with signs: This refers to Moses' staff, as it is said: God said to Moses, "Take this staff, with which you shall perform the signs." And with wonders: This refers to the plague of blood, as it is said: "I will put wonders in the heavens and the earth: blood and fire and pillars of smoke."

Another interpretation: With a strong hand two plagues, and with an outstretched arm two plagues, And with great manifestation two plagues, and with signs two plagues, and with wonders two plagues.

These are the ten plagues that the Holy One, Blessed be He, brought against the Egyptians in Egypt, and they are as follows:

BloodFrogs. LiceWild beasts. Disease of livestock. Boils. HailLocusts. Darkness. Death of the firstborn.

Rabbi Judah had an acronym for them: DeTsaKh ADaSh BeAChaV.19 

Rabbi Yose the Galilean said: "How do we know that the Egyptians were afflicted by ten plagues in Egypt and by fifty plagues at the sea?" With regard to Egypt, scripture says: "The magicians said to Pharaoh, 'This is the finger of God." And with regard to the sea it says: "And Israel saw the great hand of Adonai's deeds in Egypt, and the people feared Adonai, and they had faith in Adonai and in his servant Moses." If with one finger they were afflicted with ten plagues, then in Egypt they were afflicted with ten plagues and at the sea they were afflicted with fifty plagues. Rabbi Eliezer said: "How do we know that each and every plague that the Holy One, Blessed Be He, brought against the Egyptians in Egypt consisted of four plagues? It is said: “He sent against them his burning anger, wrath, fury, distress, and messengers of evil." 

Wrath one (first plague), fury two (second plague), distress three (third plagues), messengers of evil four (fourth plagues). Thus, in Egypt they were afflicted with forty plagues, and on the sea they were afflicted with two hundred plagues.

Rabbi Akiva said: "How do we know that each and every plague that the Holy One, Blessed Be He, brought against the Egyptians in Egypt consisted of five plagues?" As the scriptures said: "He sent against them his fierce anger, wrath, fury, distress, and messengers of evil." His fierce anger – one, wrath – two, fury – three, distress – four, messengers of evil – fivem plagues. Thus, in Egypt they were afflicted with fifty plagues, and at the sea they were afflicted with two hundred fifty plagues.

What favor the Omnipresent has shown us!

If He had brought us out of Egypt but had not executed judgments against the Egyptians, it would have been enough for us!

If He had executed judgments against the Egyptians but had not acted against their gods, it would have been enough for us!

If He had acted against their gods, but had not killed their firstborn, it would have been enough for us!

If He had killed their firstborn, but had not given us their wealth, it would have been enough for us!

If He had given us their wealth, but had not split the sea for us, it would have been enough for us!

If He had split the sea for us, but had not brought us through it on dry land, it would have been enough for us!

If He had brought us through it on dry land, but had not drowned our oppressors within it, it would have been enough for us!

If He had drowned our oppressors within it, but had not satisfied our needs in the wilderness for forty years, it would have been enough for us!

If He had satisfied our needs in the wilderness for forty years, but had not fed us the manna, it would have been enough for us!

If He had fed us the manna, but had not given us the Sabbath, it would have been enough for us!

If He had given us the Sabbath, but had not brought us before Mount Sinai, it would have been enough for us!

If He had brought us before Mount Sinai, but had not given us the Torah, it would have been enough for us!

If He had given us the Torah, but had not brought us into the land of Israel, it would have been enough for us!

If he had brought us into the land of Israel, but had not built the temple for us, it would have been enough for us!

What abundant, manifold goodness the Omnipresent has shown us! He brought us out of Egypt, and executed judgments against the Egyptians, and acted against their gods, and killed their firstborn, and gave us their wealth, and split the sea for us, and brought us through it on dry land, and drowned our enemies within it, and satisfied our needs in the desert for forty years, and fed us the manna, and gave us the Sabbath,and brought us before Mount Sinai, and gave us the Torah, and brought us into the land of Israel, and built the temple for us to atone for all our transgressions.

Rabban Gamliel would say: Anyone who does not mention these three things on Passover does not fulfill his obligation, and these are they: the Passover offering, the matzah, and the bitter herbs.

The Passover offering that our ancestors would eat at the time that temple stood, what does it represent? It recalls how the Holy One, Blessed Be He, passed over the houses of our ancestors in Egypt, as it is said: "You shall say, 'This is a Passover sacrifice to Adonai, who passed over the houses of the Israelites in Egypt when he smote Egypt and spared our houses.' And the people bowed low."

The matzah that we eat, what does it represent? It recalls that our ancestors' dough did not have time to rise before Sovereign of Sovereigns, the Holy One, Blessed Be He, was revealed to them and redeemed them. As it is said: "They baked the dough that they brought out of Egypt into loaves of matzah because it did not rise, because they were thrown out of Egypt and they were not able to wait; neither did they prepare provisions for themselves."

The bitter herbs that we eat, what do they represent? They recall how the Egyptians embittered the lives of our ancestors in Egypt, as it is said: "And the Egyptians embittered their lives with hard labor in mortar and bricks, and with all sorts of labor in the field – all their labor that they set upon them was brutal."

In every generation, one must view oneself as though one had personally left Egypt, as it is said: "And you shall say to your child on that day, 'This is because of what the Lord did for me when I left Egypt.'" It was not only our ancestors that the Holy One, Blessed Be He, redeemed. Rather, even we were redeemed with them, as it is said: "And he brought us out of there in order to bring us to and give us the land that he promised to our ancestors."

Therefore, we are obligated to thank, praise, extol, honor, exalt, glorify, bless, laud, and worship the One who performed all these miracles for our ancestors and for us. He brought us out of slavery to freedom, from anguish to joy, from mourning to festivity, from darkness to great light, and from subjugation to redemption. We shall therefore sing before Him a new song Halleluiah!

Halleluiah! Praise, servants of Adonai - Praise the name of Adonai! May the name of Adonai be blessed forever and ever. From the rising of the sun to its setting the name of Adonai is praised. Adonai is exalted above all the nations His glory is over the heavens. Who is like Adonai, our God, who dwells so high, who humbles Himself to see the heavens and the earth? He raises the poor from the dust, lifting the destitute out of the refuse, to seat them among nobles, among the nobles of (His) people. He makes the barren woman to the house into a happy mother of children. Praise God!

When Israel left Egypt, the house of Jacob from a foreign land, Judah became His holy one, Israel His dominion. The sea saw and fled, the Jordan turned back. The mountains danced like rams, the hills like lambs. Why is it, Sea, that you flee, Jordan, that you turn back? Mountains, that you dance like rams, Hills, like lambs? It is from before the Lord that the land writhes, before the God of Jacob! He turns the rock into a pool of water, flint into a spring of water.

Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, who redeemed us and redeemed our ancestors from Egypt and brought us to this night on which to eat matzah and bitter herbs. Likewise, may Adonai, our God and God of our ancestors, bring us to other holidays and festivals that await us in peace, with happiness at the building of Your city and joy in Your service. There may we eat of the sacrifices and of the Passover offerings, and may their blood reach the walls of Your altar with Your favor. Then we will sing to You a new song about our redemption and the rescue of our lives. Blessed are You, Adonai, Redeemer of Israel.

(Second Cup)20 Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, creator of the fruit of the vine.

(Rach’tzah) Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, who sanctified us with Your commandments and commanded us concerning hand-washing.

(Mo’tzi) Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, who brings bread from the earth.

Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, who sanctified us with Your commandments and commanded us regarding the eating of matzah.

(Maror) Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, who sanctified us with Your commandments and commanded us concerning the eating of bitter herbs.

(Ko'rech) In memory of the temple, in accordance with the custom of Hillel: This is what Hillel used to do when the temple stood: He would make a sandwich of the Passover sacrifice,the matzah, and the bitter herbs and eat them together in order to fulfill literally that which is written in scripture: "They shall eat the Passover offering with matzah and maror."

Shul'chan O'rech. Tza'fun.21 Grace After Meals. Third Cup. (illegible).

Ha'llel.22 Lo La'nu.23 Ad Sof.24

Thank Adonai, for He is good, for His kindness is eternal25

Thank the God of gods, for…  Thank the greatest Lord, for… 

The One who performs great wonders by Himself, for…The One who created the heavens in wisdom, for

The One who spread out the earth over the waters, for…The One who created the great luminaries, for

The sun, to rule over the day, for… The moon and the stars to rule over the night, for… 

The one who struck down the firstborns of Egypt, for …And redeemed Israel from their midst, for

With a strong hand and an outstretched arm, for … Who split the sea in two, for

And brought Israel through its midst, for … And drowned Pharaoh and his army in the Sea of Reeds,26 for …

Who led His people through the wilderness, for… Who struck down great kings, for

And killed mighty kings, for … Sichon, king of the Amorites, for … 

And Og, king of Bashan, for … And He granted their land as an inheritance, for … 

An inheritance for His servant Israel, for …For He remembered us in our lowliness, for … 

And He freed us from our affliction, for … He gives food to all flesh, for

Thank the God of Heaven, for His kindness is eternal!

The Soul of Every Living Being (Shall Bless Your Name) 

(Fourth Cup) Blessed are You, Adonai, our God, Sovereign of the universe, creator of the fruit of the vine.

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Sovereign of the universe, for the vine and for the fruit of the vine, for the produce of the field, and for the beloved, good, and broad land that you desired and bequeathed to our ancestors so that they could eat of its fruit and be sated with its goodness. Have mercy, Adonai our God, on Your people, Israel, on Your city, Jerusalem, on Zion, the dwelling-place of Your Glory, on Your altar, and on Your temple. Rebuild the holy city of Jerusalem speedily in our days, bring us to it, and let us rejoice in it. Then we will eat of its fruit and be sated with its goodness, and we will bless You for it in holiness and purity. (May it be your will to strengthen us on this Sabbath day). Let us rejoice on this festival of Matzos. For You, Adonai, are good and do good for everyone, and we thank You for the land and for the fruit of the vine. Blessed are You, Adonai, for the land and for the fruit of the vine.

The Passover Seder has been completed correctly according to all its laws and regulations. Just as we merited to have a Passover Seder, so may we merit to bring the Passover offering. Pure One, who dwells in the heavens, raise up the assembly that cannot be numbered. Bring near the day when You lead the stock that you planted, redeemed, to Zion in joy.

For the next year in Jerusalem.

The Count of the Omer for the second night of Passover27

Blessed are You, Adonai our God, Sovereign of the universe, who sanctified us with Your commandments and commanded us to count the Omer. Today is the first day of the Omer.

Because it is proper for Him, because it befits Him (Ki lau noé Ki lau joé)

Because it is proper for Him, because it befits Him. Mighty in sovereignty, rightly select. His minions say to Him: "Yours and Yours, Yours because it is Yours, Yours and only Yours— Yours, Adonai, is sovereignty!" Exalted in sovereignty, rightly glorious. His faithful ones say to Him: "Yours and Yours, Yours because it is Yours, Yours and only Yours— Yours, Adonai, is sovereignty!: Blameless in sovereignty, rightly powerful. His generals say to Him: "Yours and Yours, Yours because it is Yours, Yours and only Yours— Yours, Adonai, is sovereignty!" Singular in sovereignty, rightly strong. His learned ones say to Him: "Yours and Yours, Yours because it is Yours, Yours and only Yours— Yours, Adonai, is sovereignty!" Exalted in sovereignty, rightly awesome. Those who surround Him say to Him: "Yours and Yours, Yours because it is Yours, Yours and only Yours— Yours, Adonai, is sovereignty!" Humble in sovereignty, rightly saving. His righteous ones say to Him: "Yours and Yours, Yours because it is Yours, Yours and only Yours— Yours, Adonai, is sovereignty!" Holy in sovereignty, rightly merciful. His multitudes say to Him: "Yours and Yours, Yours because it is Yours, Yours and only Yours— Yours, Adonai, is sovereignty!" Strong in sovereignty, rightly supportive. His perfect ones say to Him: "Yours and Yours, Yours because it is Yours, Yours and only Yours— Yours, Adonai, is sovereignty!"

He is mighty. May He rebuild His temple soon! Speedily, speedily, in our days, soon!

God, build! God, build! Rebuild Your temple soon! He is select. He is great. He is lofty.

May He rebuild……….. He is glorious. He is righteous. He is blameless. He is pious.

May He rebuild……….. He is pure. He is singular. He is tremendous. He is learned. He is Sovereign. He is enlightened. He is exalted. He is powerful. He is salvific. He is just. May He rebuild……….. He is holy. He is merciful. He is God. He is commanding. May He rebuild………..

Who knows one? I know one! One is our God in the heavens and the earth.

Who knows two? I know two! Two are the tablets of the covenant, and one etc. 

Who knows three? I know three! Three are the fathers, two …

Who knows four? I know four! Four are the matriarchs, three …

Who knows five? I know five! Five are the books of the Torah, four …

Who knows six? I know six! Six are the orders of the Mishnah, fi. …

Who knows seven? I know seven! seven are the days of the week, six …

Who knows eight? I know eight! Eight are the days until circumcision, seven…

Who knows nine? I know nine! Nine are the months of pregnancy, eight…

Who knows ten? I know ten! Ten are the commandments, nine …

Who knows eleven? I know eleven! Eleven are the stars in Joseph's dream, ten …

Who knows twelve? I know twelve! Twelve are the tribes of Israel, eleven …

Who knows thirteen? I know thirteen! Thirteen are the attributes of God's mercy, twelve etc. 

One little goat, one little goat that my father bought for two zuzim.28 

A cat came and ate the goat that my father bought …..

A dog came and bit the cat that ate the goat …..

A stick came and hit the dog that bit the cat …..

A fire came and burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat …..

Water came and put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat …..

An ox came and drank the water that put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat …..

A butcher came and slaughtered the ox that drank the water that put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat …..

The angel of death came and slaughtered the butcher who slaughtered the ox that drank the water that put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat …..

Then the Holy One, Blessed be He, came and slaughtered the angel of death who slaughtered the butcher who slaughtered the ox that drank the water that put out the fire that burned the stick that bit the dog that bit the cat that ate the goat that my father bought for two zuzim. One little goat, one little goat.

Edited by the Rabbinate of Rabbi Leo Ansbacher, Gurs (France) Nissan 5701.29

 

Archival Information for This Item

Source (Credit)
US Holocaust Memorial Museum
Accession Number 2000.552.1
Date Created
1941
Author / Creator
Rabbi Leo Ansbacher
Aryeh Ludwig Zuckerman
Publisher
Courtesy of Joan Inge Maas
Language(s)
French
German
Hebrew
Location
Gurs, France
Document Type Religious Text
How to Cite Museum Materials